Cover photo for Dorothy Dunn's Obituary
Dorothy Dunn Profile Photo
1908 Dorothy 2013

Dorothy Dunn

July 21, 1908 — December 4, 2013

Dorothy Dunn, age 105, died Wednesday, December 4, 2013 at PioneerCare in Fergus Falls, MN.Funeral services will be held later in the spring.This is an artice written by Doris's nephew, Marlyn Hanson.Not many people are blessed to live on this planet as long as 105 years, but if personal merit and goodness is any measure of the time one should be given, Dorothy Dunn has certainly earned her right to live well past the century mark. Miss, yes we said Miss, Dunn was born to Dolphy John and Elsie Mae Dunn on July 21, 1908 in what would later become Dunvilla. She was the eldest of six children, and has outlived all her siblings but one, Willard, who has lived in both Texas and Minnesota in recent years. As a young lady, Dorothy helped raise her younger brothers and sisters due to ailing health of her mother and the tough farm life in rural Minnesota at the time. Harold John Dunn, born three years after Dorothy, was struck with muscular sclerosis as a baby, and required constant care as he was growing up. Ferne Marie Dunn was born eight years after Dorothy in 1917. Another brother, Denis, was born in 1920 while Willard Wilson Dunn was born in 1925. The youngest brother, Clifford Douglas Dunn was the youngest child. In addition to caring for her siblings, Dorothy attended a one room school in Scambler township, acquiring enough education to be an extensive reader and to maintain a detailed diary throughout her entire life. After the death of her mother she needed to spend full time at home becoming the lady of the house throughout the Great Depression, while the family farmed in Erhard, Minnesota. Ever cheerful, she gave up marrying and making a family of her own to care for her birth family. Another tragedy befell her August 25, 1949, when her sister Ferne passed away leaving a one year old son, Marlyn, without a mother. As she had so often in the past, Dorothy volunteered to take care of Marlyn when his father, Martin Hanson, related that he had no means to work and take care of an infant at the same time. She then was the lady of the house, preparing food, washing clothes, cleaning house, and tending with all the chores on a 300 acre farm complete with a herd of Holstein cattle and numerous crops. She then took care of her crippled brother Harold, young Marlyn, and assisted Denis and her father with farming. Brothers Willard had just returned from World War II in Germany and youngest brother Clifford was about to leave for yet another war in Korea. Life remained very busy for the family which moved from the farm in Erhard to one near Pelican Rapids, another near Dent, another near Perham and finally moving to a small home in rural Pelican Rapids after Marlyn graduated high school and left for the Air Force in 1966. Her father Dolphy and youngest brother Clifford had both passed away in 1963. Dolphy went into the hospital for a routine check up, and passed away in a bath tub for reasons which never became clear. Clifford, always a fast driver and the most adventurous of the family, was killed in an automobile accident in his new Pontiac Bonneville convertible near St. Cloud Minnesota. With only her, Denis and Harold, who remained crippled until his death in 1968, the massive amount of work involved in farming was no longer viable for the aging family. Denis began working for the turkey plant in Pelican Rapids, which he continued until his death in yet another auto accident on May 31, 1996. Soon after the auto accident, Miss Dunn, unable to live alone at 88 years of age, was forced to move out of the family home. Dorothy lived for a short period at the Mill Pond apartments before settling into her permanent residence at the Good Samaritan Senior Citizen Center in Pelican Rapids. Dorothy was famous for her extra-ordinary cooking abilities. During fall harvests, roving groups of farmers moved from homestead to homestead with threshing machines helping each other bringing their crops to their silos or to market. Dorothy cooked meals for dozens of workers as they took breaks from the hours work for dinner and supper for weeks each fall. She was just as popular with political forces at the time in that her cousin Roy Dunn, a member of the Texas House of Representatives from 1924 until 1964, would often visit the home with a friend, Hubert Humphrey, when they were visiting homes as they campaigned for their respective offices. Incidentally, Roy enjoyed exceptional longevity as well, living far past his retirement, passing away at the age of 99 in 1985. The Family Tree Discussing the Dunn family tree is an interesting subject in itself. Public service did not begin with Dorothy's cousin Roy in the Minnesota legislature (he served as Majority Leader of the House of Representatives from 1935-1937 and then again for an astoundingly long period from 1939 until 1955). The first member of the Dunn clan to move to America was Hugh O-Dunn, moving to our shores in 1760 with his son William, who was 20 years of age at the time. They settled in York, Pennsylvania before moving to "Great Island," Pennsylvania, which was known for its very fertile land and the abundant bounty enjoyed by the Indians who lived there. William loved his new country and almost immediately dropped the "O" prefix from his name, thus becoming William Dunn. Dunn was known as a shrewd and enterprising negotiator, worked out a deal with a Muncie Indian Chief Newahleeka to trade a silver mounted rifle, a hatchet and a keg of whiskey for 325 acres of land on the island. The Chief did later try to back out of the deal, but Dunn would have none of it and remained there as a squatter during those early pre-Revolutionary War days. William was very patriotic and jumped at the chance to fight the British in the Revolutionary War. It is even recorded over his grave that Dunn served in "Pulaski's Legion" of the Continental Troops during the war. After his discharge, William returned to Great Island and began working with the "Province of Pennsylvania" for legal title to the land now that the British were no longer in charge. He was able to secure 300 acres for a 30 pound (dollars were still not in existence) fee in silver or gold per acre. By 1785, he had received title to an additional 312 acres because of his service during the war. The village of Dunnstown, Pennsylvania was created by Dunn and his wife Sallie McKestry Dunn. William and Sallie had seven children, Ester, James, William Jr, Rebecca, Mary, Merab and John. Sallie passed away in 1782 after which William married Margaret McClelland Harrision, who had also lost her mate. Margaret proved an excellent wife to William, working with him on the continuing formation of Dunnstown and working out deals on numerous lots that were sold to settlers in the area. William had two additional children with Margaret, Washington and James. The Dunns even were known for constructing one of the first manufacturering facilities for whiskey in the area, having been assessed for a "Still House" on the 1790 tax rolls. The still remained until it was turned into a tavern by a great-granddaughter of the Dunns. James Dunn married Elizabeth Alexander and they continued the tradition of having many children: William 3rd, Elmer, Eliza, James Jr, Washington, David, Samuel, Alex, John, Polly and Jane. Also following the family's patriotic bent, James and all eight of his sons enlisted in the military and fought the British again in the War of 1812. A patriotic cousin, John Wilson Dunn, was known as the "little drummer boy" (made famous in American folklore) of the war of 1812. The history of John Wilson Dunn, is of particular interest in that he is the grandfather of Dolphy Dunn, Dorothy's father. He was known to have gone by his middle name, Wilson, rather than his given name of John, which was the name he gave his first born son. The history of the family was to change as Wilson chose to marry outside his Irish heritage choosing French woman Nanci Anne Reynoud. Reynoud had been taken to America when she was a baby by her parents, who were members of the French aristocracy and fled to avoid the guillotine. Her records had been falsified when they came to America because her parents had been terrified of being located and returned to France for execution. Nanci's name was officially changed to Nancy Reynolds, but she refused, to her dying day to renounce her heritage, or to master the nuances of the English language. The family sold much of their holdings in Pennsylvania and scattered to Chappaqua, New York, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois. John Wilson Dunn and Nancy missed Pennsylvania and moved back in 1846. While living there, Flora Ann Dunn, John M Dunn (Dorothy's grandfather), William E Dunn and Viola Dunn were born. The Dunn women, lead by Nancy, began to complain of the bluish oily film that began to spread over the streams and bubble up from the ground in their new Pennsylvania holdings. They noted that the water tasted terrible, it ruined clothing, and made life difficult in many ways. By the mid-1850s, (John) Wilson Dunn had enough and through a blanket into a stream, took it out and wrung it out into a container. Chemists then tested it and found it to burn. Dunn sold his interest in the land surrounding what later became known as Oil Creek and moved the entire family to Big Foot Prairie in Illinois where the water was pure and the oily substance was not evident. They remained in Illinois for only four years, deciding to once more move west, then settling in Wisconsin. They lived there until 1874 when (John) Wilson, who had developed a large herd of hogs and other animals, fell when feeding them and was trampled to death. Children continued to manage the farm but at the advent of the Civil War, the patriotic bug bit the family again with young members of the family fleeing to join the Union Army. John's (Dorothy's grandfather) brother George was so intent on serving he falsified his age and joined anyway. He was inducted on March 10, 1862 but only served six weeks as he received a leg would after only ten days. After recovery, George migrated to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and enlisted in the Minnesota Rangers. After once again being released he rejoined the Union forces and served until October 9, 1865, after having served with General Sherman in the infamous March to the Sea. Thereafter, George returned to the family homestead, after which the clan moved to Minnesota in 1873. Dolphy John Dunn was the second of the family (Roy having been the first) to be born in what was to become Dunn Township near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. He was born on April 1, 1889, just a year before the population of the area would grow to 25 people, the number sufficient to form a township. Dolphy's father John, was a quiet, gentle man with a personality very similar to Dorothy. He was extremely considerate of others, and looked for considerable advice on whom to marry. He was counseled by his friends and relatives to marry a young girl who would honor him above all others. He found what he considered a perfect match, a young Indian maiden named Rosetta Lightfoot. She had been born in Indiana and was only 13 years of age when they were wed. As things turned out, Rosetta was a strong matriarch for the family, very hardworking, very bright, with efforts contributing to him becoming a very weathly man throughout his lifetime. Rosetta and Johns first child was Clara Dunn, born in 1878. Dolphy and his twin sister, Elizabeth Dorpheus (known as Dorphy), were the subjects of a lot of local folklore for decades after a unique incident which occurred on their family farm when they were children. Dorphy was known as a headstrong young lady, completely unlike her father. She assumed the task of going out into the farms farthest acres to bring home the cattle for milking each evening. She would sing or whistle so wolves, bears and other wild animals would leave the area and leave her to her task in peace. One evening while chasing the cows home she was met with a huge hairy figure bolting up from the weeds on one side growling at her. Dorphy promptly pulled a revolver from her apron and shot the beast. Fortunately, she was a bit high, only creasing the very top of its head making a deep furrow in the scalp from the path of the bullet. As it turns out, the "beast" was her mischievous brother Dolphy, who had been attempting to force her to be more cautious when she went out for the cows. The fact that he covered himself with the thick hide of a bear saved his life. The thick hide deflected the bullet just enough so the bullet only creased him. Dolphy and Dorphy's sister Clara married Ray Ballard. Dorphy married Ray's brother Wesley Ballard. Westley and Dorphy named a son Ray after Wesley's brother. Ray and his wife Ginger lived out their lives in the Pelican Rapids area and had a number of children, of which Ginger Rae, Billy, and Jackie still reside in the area. Roy E Dunn, Dolphy's cousin, was the son of John's brother William E Dunn. Roy had a brother, Frank and two sisters Bessie and Laura. Roy was born in May of 1886. Roy is well known in many Minnesota historical circles in that he not only founded Dunvilla Resort but also served in the Minnesota legislature from 1924 through 1966. Roy and his wife, Anna Laura, had only one child, a daughter who married a doctor and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Roy and his father had the vision to buy out a disgruntled homesteader who owned 160 acres and a lot of shoreline on Lake Lizzie in the early 1900s. The startling price of the land and the lakeshore property was the princely sum of $40. They began building cabins on the lakeshore in 1908 and before long had constructed two dozen cabins on the shore. After Roy was elected to the legislature, a main lodge, styled after a California mission, was built. Vacationers from across the entire Midwest flooded to the Lodge for years before Dunn retired, sold out, and moved to live out his final years in St. Paul. Editor's Note: This has been compiled by Marlyn Hanson (penname Marlon Hanson), nephew of Dorothy Dunn. She has been a better mother than any person could be over the many years of his life. She is truly a wonderful person to all who have ever known her, having devoted her life to her family rather than seeking anything for herself. She has remained intensely religious for the entire time I have known her and undoubtedly will brighten heaven when she is finally called home. Special thanks to Perlia Jean King, who wrote a book "A Familty through the Centuries 800-1996" covering the history of the Dunns and the O'Dunns before them. The information is used with permission for any member of the family descendents. St. Cloud Minnesota. With only her, Denis and Harold, who remained crippled until his death in 1968, the massive amount of work involved in farming was no longer viable for the aging family. Denis began working for the turkey plant in Pelican Rapids, which he continued until his death in yet another auto accident on May 31, 1996. Soon after the auto accident, Miss Dunn, unable to live alone at 88 years of age, was forced to move out of the family home. Dorothy lived for a short period at the Mill Pond apartments before settling into her permanent residence at the Good Samaritan Senior Citizen Center in Pelican Rapids. Dorothy was famous for her extra-ordinary cooking abilities. During fall harvests, roving groups of farmers moved from homestead to homestead with threshing machines helping each other bringing their crops to their silos or to market. Dorothy cooked meals for dozens of workers as they took breaks from the hours work for dinner and supper for weeks each fall. She was just as popular with political forces at the time in that her cousin Roy Dunn, a member of the Texas House of Representatives from 1924 until 1964, would often visit the home with a friend, Hubert Humphrey, when they were visiting homes as they campaigned for their respective offices. Incidentally, Roy enjoyed exceptional longevity as well, living far past his retirement, passing away at the age of 99 in 1985. The Family Tree Discussing the Dunn family tree is an interesting subject in itself. Public service did not begin with Dorothy's cousin Roy in the Minnesota legislature (he served as Majority Leader of the House of Representatives from 1935-1937 and then again for an astoundingly long period from 1939 until 1955). The first member of the Dunn clan to move to America was Hugh O-Dunn, moving to our shores in 1760 with his son William, who was 20 years of age at the time. They settled in York, Pennsylvania before moving to "Great Island," Pennsylvania, which was known for its very fertile land and the abundant bounty enjoyed by the Indians who lived there. William loved his new country and almost immediately dropped the "O" prefix from his name, thus becoming William Dunn. Dunn was known as a shrewd and enterprising negotiator, worked out a deal with a Muncie Indian Chief Newahleeka to trade a silver mounted rifle, a hatchet and a keg of whiskey for 325 acres of land on the island. The Chief did later try to back out of the deal, but Dunn would have none of it and remained there as a squatter during those early pre-Revolutionary War days. William was very patriotic and jumped at the chance to fight the British in the Revolutionary War. It is even recorded over his grave that Dunn served in "Pulaski's Legion" of the Continental Troops during the war. After his discharge, William returned to Great Island and began working with the "Province of Pennsylvania" for legal title to the land now that the British were no longer in charge. He was able to secure 300 acres for a 30 pound (dollars were still not in existence) fee in silver or gold per acre. By 1785, he had received title to an additional 312 acres because of his service during the war. The village of Dunnstown, Pennsylvania was created by Dunn and his wife Sallie McKestry Dunn. William and Sallie had seven children, Ester, James, William Jr, Rebecca, Mary, Merab and John. Sallie passed away in 1782 after which William married Margaret McClelland Harrision, who had also lost her mate. Margaret proved an excellent wife to William, working with him on the continuing formation of Dunnstown and working out deals on numerous lots that were sold to settlers in the area. William had two additional children with Margaret, Washington and James. The Dunns even were known for constructing one of the first manufacturering facilities for whiskey in the area, having been assessed for a "Still House" on the 1790 tax rolls. The still remained until it was turned into a tavern by a great-granddaughter of the Dunns. James Dunn married Elizabeth Alexander and they continued the tradition of having many children: William 3rd, Elmer, Eliza, James Jr, Washington, David, Samuel, Alex, John, Polly and Jane. Also following the family's patriotic bent, James and all eight of his sons enlisted in the military and fought the British again in the War of 1812. A patriotic cousin, John Wilson Dunn, was known as the "little drummer boy" (made famous in American folklore) of the war of 1812. The history of John Wilson Dunn, is of particular interest in that he is the grandfather of Dolphy Dunn, Dorothy's father. He was known to have gone by his middle name, Wilson, rather than his given name of John, which was the name he gave his first born son. The history of the family was to change as Wilson chose to marry outside his Irish heritage choosing French woman Nanci Anne Reynoud. Reynoud had been taken to America when she was a baby by her parents, who were members of the French aristocracy and fled to avoid the guillotine. Her records had been falsified when they came to America because her parents had been terrified of being located and returned to France for execution. Nanci's name was officially changed to Nancy Reynolds, but she refused, to her dying day to renounce her heritage, or to master the nuances of the English language. The family sold much of their holdings in Pennsylvania and scattered to Chappaqua, New York, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois. John Wilson Dunn and Nancy missed Pennsylvania and moved back in 1846. While living there, Flora Ann Dunn, John M Dunn (Dorothy's grandfather), William E Dunn and Viola Dunn were born. The Dunn women, lead by Nancy, began to complain of the bluish oily film that began to spread over the streams and bubble up from the ground in their new Pennsylvania holdings. They noted that the water tasted terrible, it ruined clothing, and made life difficult in many ways. By the mid-1850s, (John) Wilson Dunn had enough and through a blanket into a stream, took it out and wrung it out into a container. Chemists then tested it and found it to burn. Dunn sold his interest in the land surrounding what later became known as Oil Creek and moved the entire family to Big Foot Prairie in Illinois where the water was pure and the oily substance was not evident. They remained in Illinois for only four years, deciding to once more move west, then settling in Wisconsin. They lived there until 1874 when (John) Wilson, who had developed a large herd of hogs and other animals, fell when feeding them and was trampled to death. Children continued to manage the farm but at the advent of the Civil War, the patriotic bug bit the family again with young members of the family fleeing to join the Union Army. John's (Dorothy's grandfather) brother George was so intent on serving he falsified his age and joined anyway. He was inducted on March 10, 1862 but only served six weeks as he received a leg would after only ten days. After recovery, George migrated to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and enlisted in the Minnesota Rangers. After once again being released he rejoined the Union forces and served until October 9, 1865, after having served with General Sherman in the infamous March to the Sea. Thereafter, George returned to the family homestead, after which the clan moved to Minnesota in 1873. Dolphy John Dunn was the second of the family (Roy having been the first) to be born in what was to become Dunn Township near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. He was born on April 1, 1889, just a year before the population of the area would grow to 25 people, the number sufficient to form a township. Dolphy's father John, was a quiet, gentle man with a personality very similar to Dorothy. He was extremely considerate of others, and looked for considerable advice on whom to marry. He was counseled by his friends and relatives to marry a young girl who would honor him above all others. He found what he considered a perfect match, a young Indian maiden named Rosetta Lightfoot. She had been born in Indiana and was only 13 years of age when they were wed. As things turned out, Rosetta was a strong matriarch for the family, very hardworking, very bright, with efforts contributing to him becoming a very weathly man throughout his lifetime. Rosetta and Johns first child was Clara Dunn, born in 1878. Dolphy and his twin sister, Elizabeth Dorpheus (known as Dorphy), were the subjects of a lot of local folklore for decades after a unique incident which occurred on their family farm when they were children. Dorphy was known as a headstrong young lady, completely unlike her father. She assumed the task of going out into the farms farthest acres to bring home the cattle for milking each evening. She would sing or whistle so wolves, bears and other wild animals would leave the area and leave her to her task in peace. One evening while chasing the cows home she was met with a huge hairy figure bolting up from the weeds on one side growling at her. Dorphy promptly pulled a revolver from her apron and shot the beast. Fortunately, she was a bit high, only creasing the very top of its head making a deep furrow in the scalp from the path of the bullet. As it turns out, the "beast" was her mischievous brother Dolphy, who had been attempting to force her to be more cautious when she went out for the cows. The fact that he covered himself with the thick hide of a bear saved his life. The thick hide deflected the bullet just enough so the bullet only creased him. Dolphy and Dorphy's sister Clara married Ray Ballard. Dorphy married Ray's brother Wesley Ballard. Westley and Dorphy named a son Ray after Wesley's brother. Ray and his wife Ginger lived out their lives in the Pelican Rapids area and had a number of children, of which Ginger Rae, Billy, and Jackie still reside in the area. Roy E Dunn, Dolphy's cousin, was the son of John's brother William E Dunn. Roy had a brother, Frank and two sisters Bessie and Laura. Roy was born in May of 1886. Roy is well known in many Minnesota historical circles in that he not only founded Dunvilla Resort but also served in the Minnesota legislature from 1924 through 1966. Roy and his wife, Anna Laura, had only one child, a daughter who married a doctor and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Roy and his father had the vision to buy out a disgruntled homesteader who owned 160 acres and a lot of shoreline on Lake Lizzie in the early 1900s. The startling price of the land and the lakeshore property was the princely sum of $40. They began building cabins on the lakeshore in 1908 and before long had constructed two dozen cabins on the shore. After Roy was elected to the legislature, a main lodge, styled after a California mission, was built. Vacationers from across the entire Midwest flooded to the Lodge for years before Dunn retired, sold out, and moved to live out his final years in St. Paul. Editor's Note: This has been compiled by Marlyn Hanson (penname Marlon Hanson), nephew of Dorothy Dunn. She has been a better mother than any person could be over the many years of his life. She is truly a wonderful person to all who have ever known her, having devoted her life to her family rather than seeking anything for herself. She has remained intensely religious for the entire time I have known her and undoubtedly will brighten heaven when she is finally called home. Special thanks to Perlia Jean King, who wrote a book "A Familty through the Centuries 800-1996" covering the history of the Dunns and the O'Dunns before them. The information is used with permission for any member of the family descendents. Pennsylvania before moving to "Great Island," Pennsylvania, which was known for its very fertile land and the abundant bounty enjoyed by the Indians who lived there. William loved his new country and almost immediately dropped the "O" prefix from his name, thus becoming William Dunn. Dunn was known as a shrewd and enterprising negotiator, worked out a deal with a Muncie Indian Chief Newahleeka to trade a silver mounted rifle, a hatchet and a keg of whiskey for 325 acres of land on the island. The Chief did later try to back out of the deal, but Dunn would have none of it and remained there as a squatter during those early pre-Revolutionary War days. William was very patriotic and jumped at the chance to fight the British in the Revolutionary War. It is even recorded over his grave that Dunn served in "Pulaski's Legion" of the Continental Troops during the war. After his discharge, William returned to Great Island and began working with the "Province of Pennsylvania" for legal title to the land now that the British were no longer in charge. He was able to secure 300 acres for a 30 pound (dollars were still not in existence) fee in silver or gold per acre. By 1785, he had received title to an additional 312 acres because of his service during the war. The village of Dunnstown, Pennsylvania was created by Dunn and his wife Sallie McKestry Dunn. William and Sallie had seven children, Ester, James, William Jr, Rebecca, Mary, Merab and John. Sallie passed away in 1782 after which William married Margaret McClelland Harrision, who had also lost her mate. Margaret proved an excellent wife to William, working with him on the continuing formation of Dunnstown and working out deals on numerous lots that were sold to settlers in the area. William had two additional children with Margaret, Washington and James. The Dunns even were known for constructing one of the first manufacturering facilities for whiskey in the area, having been assessed for a "Still House" on the 1790 tax rolls. The still remained until it was turned into a tavern by a great-granddaughter of the Dunns. James Dunn married Elizabeth Alexander and they continued the tradition of having many children: William 3rd, Elmer, Eliza, James Jr, Washington, David, Samuel, Alex, John, Polly and Jane. Also following the family's patriotic bent, James and all eight of his sons enlisted in the military and fought the British again in the War of 1812. A patriotic cousin, John Wilson Dunn, was known as the "little drummer boy" (made famous in American folklore) of the war of 1812. The history of John Wilson Dunn, is of particular interest in that he is the grandfather of Dolphy Dunn, Dorothy's father. He was known to have gone by his middle name, Wilson, rather than his given name of John, which was the name he gave his first born son. The history of the family was to change as Wilson chose to marry outside his Irish heritage choosing French woman Nanci Anne Reynoud. Reynoud had been taken to America when she was a baby by her parents, who were members of the French aristocracy and fled to avoid the guillotine. Her records had been falsified when they came to America because her parents had been terrified of being located and returned to France for execution. Nanci's name was officially changed to Nancy Reynolds, but she refused, to her dying day to renounce her heritage, or to master the nuances of the English language. The family sold much of their holdings in Pennsylvania and scattered to Chappaqua, New York, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois. John Wilson Dunn and Nancy missed Pennsylvania and moved back in 1846. While living there, Flora Ann Dunn, John M Dunn (Dorothy's grandfather), William E Dunn and Viola Dunn were born. The Dunn women, lead by Nancy, began to complain of the bluish oily film that began to spread over the streams and bubble up from the ground in their new Pennsylvania holdings. They noted that the water tasted terrible, it ruined clothing, and made life difficult in many ways. By the mid-1850s, (John) Wilson Dunn had enough and through a blanket into a stream, took it out and wrung it out into a container. Chemists then tested it and found it to burn. Dunn sold his interest in the land surrounding what later became known as Oil Creek and moved the entire family to Big Foot Prairie in Illinois where the water was pure and the oily substance was not evident. They remained in Illinois for only four years, deciding to once more move west, then settling in Wisconsin. They lived there until 1874 when (John) Wilson, who had developed a large herd of hogs and other animals, fell when feeding them and was trampled to death. Children continued to manage the farm but at the advent of the Civil War, the patriotic bug bit the family again with young members of the family fleeing to join the Union Army. John's (Dorothy's grandfather) brother George was so intent on serving he falsified his age and joined anyway. He was inducted on March 10, 1862 but only served six weeks as he received a leg would after only ten days. After recovery, George migrated to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and enlisted in the Minnesota Rangers. After once again being released he rejoined the Union forces and served until October 9, 1865, after having served with General Sherman in the infamous March to the Sea. Thereafter, George returned to the family homestead, after which the clan moved to Minnesota in 1873. Dolphy John Dunn was the second of the family (Roy having been the first) to be born in what was to become Dunn Township near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. He was born on April 1, 1889, just a year before the population of the area would grow to 25 people, the number sufficient to form a township. Dolphy's father John, was a quiet, gentle man with a personality very similar to Dorothy. He was extremely considerate of others, and looked for considerable advice on whom to marry. He was counseled by his friends and relatives to marry a young girl who would honor him above all others. He found what he considered a perfect match, a young Indian maiden named Rosetta Lightfoot. She had been born in Indiana and was only 13 years of age when they were wed. As things turned out, Rosetta was a strong matriarch for the family, very hardworking, very bright, with efforts contributing to him becoming a very weathly man throughout his lifetime. Rosetta and Johns first child was Clara Dunn, born in 1878. Dolphy and his twin sister, Elizabeth Dorpheus (known as Dorphy), were the subjects of a lot of local folklore for decades after a unique incident which occurred on their family farm when they were children. Dorphy was known as a headstrong young lady, completely unlike her father. She assumed the task of going out into the farms farthest acres to bring home the cattle for milking each evening. She would sing or whistle so wolves, bears and other wild animals would leave the area and leave her to her task in peace. One evening while chasing the cows home she was met with a huge hairy figure bolting up from the weeds on one side growling at her. Dorphy promptly pulled a revolver from her apron and shot the beast. Fortunately, she was a bit high, only creasing the very top of its head making a deep furrow in the scalp from the path of the bullet. As it turns out, the "beast" was her mischievous brother Dolphy, who had been attempting to force her to be more cautious when she went out for the cows. The fact that he covered himself with the thick hide of a bear saved his life. The thick hide deflected the bullet just enough so the bullet only creased him. Dolphy and Dorphy's sister Clara married Ray Ballard. Dorphy married Ray's brother Wesley Ballard. Westley and Dorphy named a son Ray after Wesley's brother. Ray and his wife Ginger lived out their lives in the Pelican Rapids area and had a number of children, of which Ginger Rae, Billy, and Jackie still reside in the area. Roy E Dunn, Dolphy's cousin, was the son of John's brother William E Dunn. Roy had a brother, Frank and two sisters Bessie and Laura. Roy was born in May of 1886. Roy is well known in many Minnesota historical circles in that he not only founded Dunvilla Resort but also served in the Minnesota legislature from 1924 through 1966. Roy and his wife, Anna Laura, had only one child, a daughter who married a doctor and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Roy and his father had the vision to buy out a disgruntled homesteader who owned 160 acres and a lot of shoreline on Lake Lizzie in the early 1900s. The startling price of the land and the lakeshore property was the princely sum of $40. They began building cabins on the lakeshore in 1908 and before long had constructed two dozen cabins on the shore. After Roy was elected to the legislature, a main lodge, styled after a California mission, was built. Vacationers from across the entire Midwest flooded to the Lodge for years before Dunn retired, sold out, and moved to live out his final years in St. Paul. Editor's Note: This has been compiled by Marlyn Hanson (penname Marlon Hanson), nephew of Dorothy Dunn. She has been a better mother than any person could be over the many years of his life. She is truly a wonderful person to all who have ever known her, having devoted her life to her family rather than seeking anything for herself. She has remained intensely religious for the entire time I have known her and undoubtedly will brighten heaven when she is finally called home. Special thanks to Perlia Jean King, who wrote a book "A Familty through the Centuries 800-1996" covering the history of the Dunns and the O'Dunns before them. The information is used with permission for any member of the family descendents. Dunnstown, Pennsylvania was created by Dunn and his wife Sallie McKestry Dunn. William and Sallie had seven children, Ester, James, William Jr, Rebecca, Mary, Merab and John. Sallie passed away in 1782 after which William married Margaret McClelland Harrision, who had also lost her mate. Margaret proved an excellent wife to William, working with him on the continuing formation of Dunnstown and working out deals on numerous lots that were sold to settlers in the area. William had two additional children with Margaret, Washington and James. The Dunns even were known for constructing one of the first manufacturering facilities for whiskey in the area, having been assessed for a "Still House" on the 1790 tax rolls. The still remained until it was turned into a tavern by a great-granddaughter of the Dunns. James Dunn married Elizabeth Alexander and they continued the tradition of having many children: William 3rd, Elmer, Eliza, James Jr, Washington, David, Samuel, Alex, John, Polly and Jane. Also following the family's patriotic bent, James and all eight of his sons enlisted in the military and fought the British again in the War of 1812. A patriotic cousin, John Wilson Dunn, was known as the "little drummer boy" (made famous in American folklore) of the war of 1812. The history of John Wilson Dunn, is of particular interest in that he is the grandfather of Dolphy Dunn, Dorothy's father. He was known to have gone by his middle name, Wilson, rather than his given name of John, which was the name he gave his first born son. The history of the family was to change as Wilson chose to marry outside his Irish heritage choosing French woman Nanci Anne Reynoud. Reynoud had been taken to America when she was a baby by her parents, who were members of the French aristocracy and fled to avoid the guillotine. Her records had been falsified when they came to America because her parents had been terrified of being located and returned to France for execution. Nanci's name was officially changed to Nancy Reynolds, but she refused, to her dying day to renounce her heritage, or to master the nuances of the English language. The family sold much of their holdings in Pennsylvania and scattered to Chappaqua, New York, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois. John Wilson Dunn and Nancy missed Pennsylvania and moved back in 1846. While living there, Flora Ann Dunn, John M Dunn (Dorothy's grandfather), William E Dunn and Viola Dunn were born. The Dunn women, lead by Nancy, began to complain of the bluish oily film that began to spread over the streams and bubble up from the ground in their new Pennsylvania holdings. They noted that the water tasted terrible, it ruined clothing, and made life difficult in many ways. By the mid-1850s, (John) Wilson Dunn had enough and through a blanket into a stream, took it out and wrung it out into a container. Chemists then tested it and found it to burn. Dunn sold his interest in the land surrounding what later became known as Oil Creek and moved the entire family to Big Foot Prairie in Illinois where the water was pure and the oily substance was not evident. They remained in Illinois for only four years, deciding to once more move west, then settling in Wisconsin. They lived there until 1874 when (John) Wilson, who had developed a large herd of hogs and other animals, fell when feeding them and was trampled to death. Children continued to manage the farm but at the advent of the Civil War, the patriotic bug bit the family again with young members of the family fleeing to join the Union Army. John's (Dorothy's grandfather) brother George was so intent on serving he falsified his age and joined anyway. He was inducted on March 10, 1862 but only served six weeks as he received a leg would after only ten days. After recovery, George migrated to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and enlisted in the Minnesota Rangers. After once again being released he rejoined the Union forces and served until October 9, 1865, after having served with General Sherman in the infamous March to the Sea. Thereafter, George returned to the family homestead, after which the clan moved to Minnesota in 1873. Dolphy John Dunn was the second of the family (Roy having been the first) to be born in what was to become Dunn Township near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. He was born on April 1, 1889, just a year before the population of the area would grow to 25 people, the number sufficient to form a township. Dolphy's father John, was a quiet, gentle man with a personality very similar to Dorothy. He was extremely considerate of others, and looked for considerable advice on whom to marry. He was counseled by his friends and relatives to marry a young girl who would honor him above all others. He found what he considered a perfect match, a young Indian maiden named Rosetta Lightfoot. She had been born in Indiana and was only 13 years of age when they were wed. As things turned out, Rosetta was a strong matriarch for the family, very hardworking, very bright, with efforts contributing to him becoming a very weathly man throughout his lifetime. Rosetta and Johns first child was Clara Dunn, born in 1878. Dolphy and his twin sister, Elizabeth Dorpheus (known as Dorphy), were the subjects of a lot of local folklore for decades after a unique incident which occurred on their family farm when they were children. Dorphy was known as a headstrong young lady, completely unlike her father. She assumed the task of going out into the farms farthest acres to bring home the cattle for milking each evening. She would sing or whistle so wolves, bears and other wild animals would leave the area and leave her to her task in peace. One evening while chasing the cows home she was met with a huge hairy figure bolting up from the weeds on one side growling at her. Dorphy promptly pulled a revolver from her apron and shot the beast. Fortunately, she was a bit high, only creasing the very top of its head making a deep furrow in the scalp from the path of the bullet. As it turns out, the "beast" was her mischievous brother Dolphy, who had been attempting to force her to be more cautious when she went out for the cows. The fact that he covered himself with the thick hide of a bear saved his life. The thick hide deflected the bullet just enough so the bullet only creased him. Dolphy and Dorphy's sister Clara married Ray Ballard. Dorphy married Ray's brother Wesley Ballard. Westley and Dorphy named a son Ray after Wesley's brother. Ray and his wife Ginger lived out their lives in the Pelican Rapids area and had a number of children, of which Ginger Rae, Billy, and Jackie still reside in the area. Roy E Dunn, Dolphy's cousin, was the son of John's brother William E Dunn. Roy had a brother, Frank and two sisters Bessie and Laura. Roy was born in May of 1886. Roy is well known in many Minnesota historical circles in that he not only founded Dunvilla Resort but also served in the Minnesota legislature from 1924 through 1966. Roy and his wife, Anna Laura, had only one child, a daughter who married a doctor and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Roy and his father had the vision to buy out a disgruntled homesteader who owned 160 acres and a lot of shoreline on Lake Lizzie in the early 1900s. The startling price of the land and the lakeshore property was the princely sum of $40. They began building cabins on the lakeshore in 1908 and before long had constructed two dozen cabins on the shore. After Roy was elected to the legislature, a main lodge, styled after a California mission, was built. Vacationers from across the entire Midwest flooded to the Lodge for years before Dunn retired, sold out, and moved to live out his final years in St. Paul. Editor's Note: This has been compiled by Marlyn Hanson (penname Marlon Hanson), nephew of Dorothy Dunn. She has been a better mother than any person could be over the many years of his life. She is truly a wonderful person to all who have ever known her, having devoted her life to her family rather than seeking anything for herself. She has remained intensely religious for the entire time I have known her and undoubtedly will brighten heaven when she is finally called home. Special thanks to Perlia Jean King, who wrote a book "A Familty through the Centuries 800-1996" covering the history of the Dunns and the O'Dunns before them. The information is used with permission for any member of the family descendents. York, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois. John Wilson Dunn and Nancy missed Pennsylvania and moved back in 1846. While living there, Flora Ann Dunn, John M Dunn (Dorothy's grandfather), William E Dunn and Viola Dunn were born. The Dunn women, lead by Nancy, began to complain of the bluish oily film that began to spread over the streams and bubble up from the ground in their new Pennsylvania holdings. They noted that the water tasted terrible, it ruined clothing, and made life difficult in many ways. By the mid-1850s, (John) Wilson Dunn had enough and through a blanket into a stream, took it out and wrung it out into a container. Chemists then tested it and found it to burn. Dunn sold his interest in the land surrounding what later became known as Oil Creek and moved the entire family to Big Foot Prairie in Illinois where the water was pure and the oily substance was not evident. They remained in Illinois for only four years, deciding to once more move west, then settling in Wisconsin. They lived there until 1874 when (John) Wilson, who had developed a large herd of hogs and other animals, fell when feeding them and was trampled to death. Children continued to manage the farm but at the advent of the Civil War, the patriotic bug bit the family again with young members of the family fleeing to join the Union Army. John's (Dorothy's grandfather) brother George was so intent on serving he falsified his age and joined anyway. He was inducted on March 10, 1862 but only served six weeks as he received a leg would after only ten days. After recovery, George migrated to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and enlisted in the Minnesota Rangers. After once again being released he rejoined the Union forces and served until October 9, 1865, after having served with General Sherman in the infamous March to the Sea. Thereafter, George returned to the family homestead, after which the clan moved to Minnesota in 1873. Dolphy John Dunn was the second of the family (Roy having been the first) to be born in what was to become Dunn Township near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. He was born on April 1, 1889, just a year before the population of the area would grow to 25 people, the number sufficient to form a township. Dolphy's father John, was a quiet, gentle man with a personality very similar to Dorothy. He was extremely considerate of others, and looked for considerable advice on whom to marry. He was counseled by his friends and relatives to marry a young girl who would honor him above all others. He found what he considered a perfect match, a young Indian maiden named Rosetta Lightfoot. She had been born in Indiana and was only 13 years of age when they were wed. As things turned out, Rosetta was a strong matriarch for the family, very hardworking, very bright, with efforts contributing to him becoming a very weathly man throughout his lifetime. Rosetta and Johns first child was Clara Dunn, born in 1878. Dolphy and his twin sister, Elizabeth Dorpheus (known as Dorphy), were the subjects of a lot of local folklore for decades after a unique incident which occurred on their family farm when they were children. Dorphy was known as a headstrong young lady, completely unlike her father. She assumed the task of going out into the farms farthest acres to bring home the cattle for milking each evening. She would sing or whistle so wolves, bears and other wild animals would leave the area and leave her to her task in peace. One evening while chasing the cows home she was met with a huge hairy figure bolting up from the weeds on one side growling at her. Dorphy promptly pulled a revolver from her apron and shot the beast. Fortunately, she was a bit high, only creasing the very top of its head making a deep furrow in the scalp from the path of the bullet. As it turns out, the "beast" was her mischievous brother Dolphy, who had been attempting to force her to be more cautious when she went out for the cows. The fact that he covered himself with the thick hide of a bear saved his life. The thick hide deflected the bullet just enough so the bullet only creased him. Dolphy and Dorphy's sister Clara married Ray Ballard. Dorphy married Ray's brother Wesley Ballard. Westley and Dorphy named a son Ray after Wesley's brother. Ray and his wife Ginger lived out their lives in the Pelican Rapids area and had a number of children, of which Ginger Rae, Billy, and Jackie still reside in the area. Roy E Dunn, Dolphy's cousin, was the son of John's brother William E Dunn. Roy had a brother, Frank and two sisters Bessie and Laura. Roy was born in May of 1886. Roy is well known in many Minnesota historical circles in that he not only founded Dunvilla Resort but also served in the Minnesota legislature from 1924 through 1966. Roy and his wife, Anna Laura, had only one child, a daughter who married a doctor and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Roy and his father had the vision to buy out a disgruntled homesteader who owned 160 acres and a lot of shoreline on Lake Lizzie in the early 1900s. The startling price of the land and the lakeshore property was the princely sum of $40. They began building cabins on the lakeshore in 1908 and before long had constructed two dozen cabins on the shore. After Roy was elected to the legislature, a main lodge, styled after a California mission, was built. Vacationers from across the entire Midwest flooded to the Lodge for years before Dunn retired, sold out, and moved to live out his final years in St. Paul. Editor's Note: This has been compiled by Marlyn Hanson (penname Marlon Hanson), nephew of Dorothy Dunn. She has been a better mother than any person could be over the many years of his life. She is truly a wonderful person to all who have ever known her, having devoted her life to her family rather than seeking anything for herself. She has remained intensely religious for the entire time I have known her and undoubtedly will brighten heaven when she is finally called home. Special thanks to Perlia Jean King, who wrote a book "A Familty through the Centuries 800-1996" covering the history of the Dunns and the O'Dunns before them. The information is used with permission for any member of the family descendents. Dorothy Dunn to Turn 103 By Marlon Hanson Not many people are blessed to live on this planet as long as 103 years, but if personal merit and goodness is any measure of the time one should be given, Dorothy Dunn has certainly earned her right to live well past the century mark. Miss, yes we said Miss, Dunn was born to Dolphy John and Elsie Mae Dunn on July 21, 1908 in what would later become Dunvilla. She was the eldest of six children, and has outlived all her siblings but one, Willard, who has lived in both Texas and Minnesota in recent years. As a young lady, Dorothy helped raise her younger brothers and sisters due to ailing health of her mother and the tough farm life in rural Minnesota at the time. Harold John Dunn, born three years after Dorothy, was struck with muscular sclerosis as a baby, and required constant care as he was growing up. Ferne Marie Dunn was born eight years after Dorothy in 1917. Another brother, Denis, was born in 1920 while Willard Wilson Dunn was born in 1925. The youngest brother, Clifford Douglas Dunn was the youngest child. In addition to caring for her siblings, Dorothy attended a one room school in Scambler township, acquiring enough education to be an extensive reader and to maintain a detailed diary throughout her entire life. After the death of her mother she needed to spend full time at home becoming the lady of the house throughout the Great Depression, while the family farmed in Erhard, Minnesota. Ever cheerful, she gave up marrying and making a family of her own to care for her birth family. Another tragedy befell her August 25, 1949, when her sister Ferne passed away leaving a one year old son, Marlyn, without a mother. As she had so often in the past, Dorothy volunteered to take care of Marlyn when his father, Martin Hanson, related that he had no means to work and take care of an infant at the same time. She then was the lady of the house, preparing food, washing clothes, cleaning house, and tending with all the chores on a 300 acre farm complete with a herd of Holstein cattle and numerous crops. She then took care of her crippled brother Harold, young Marlyn, and assisted Denis and her father with farming. Brothers Willard had just returned from World War II in Germany and youngest brother Clifford was about to leave for yet another war in Korea. Life remained very busy for the family which moved from the farm in Erhard to one near Pelican Rapids, another near Dent, another near Perham and finally moving to a small home in rural Pelican Rapids after Marlyn graduated high school and left for the Air Force in 1966. Her father Dolphy and youngest brother Clifford had both passed away in 1963. Dolphy went into the hospital for a routine check up, and passed away in a bath tub for reasons which never became clear. Clifford, always a fast driver and the most adventurous of the family, was killed in an automobile accident in his new Pontiac Bonneville convertible near St. Cloud Minnesota. With only her, Denis and Harold, who remained crippled until his death in 1968, the massive amount of work involved in farming was no longer viable for the aging family. Denis began working for the turkey plant in Pelican Rapids, which he continued until his death in yet another auto accident on May 31, 1996. Soon after the auto accident, Miss Dunn, unable to live alone at 88 years of age, was forced to move out of the family home. Dorothy lived for a short period at the Mill Pond apartments before settling into her permanent residence at the Good Samaritan Senior Citizen Center in Pelican Rapids. Dorothy was famous for her extra-ordinary cooking abilities. During fall harvests, roving groups of farmers moved from homestead to homestead with threshing machines helping each other bringing their crops to their silos or to market. Dorothy cooked meals for dozens of workers as they took breaks from the hours work for dinner and supper for weeks each fall. She was just as popular with political forces at the time in that her cousin Roy Dunn, a member of the Texas House of Representatives from 1924 until 1964, would often visit the home with a friend, Hubert Humphrey, when they were visiting homes as they campaigned for their respective offices. Incidentally, Roy enjoyed exceptional longevity as well, living far past his retirement, passing away at the age of 99 in 1985. The Family Tree Discussing the Dunn family tree is an interesting subject in itself. Public service did not begin with Dorothy's cousin Roy in the Minnesota legislature (he served as Majority Leader of the House of Representatives from 1935-1937 and then again for an astoundingly long period from 1939 until 1955). The first member of the Dunn clan to move to America was Hugh O-Dunn, moving to our shores in 1760 with his son William, who was 20 years of age at the time. They settled in York, Pennsylvania before moving to "Great Island," Pennsylvania, which was known for its very fertile land and the abundant bounty enjoyed by the Indians who lived there. William loved his new country and almost immediately dropped the "O" prefix from his name, thus becoming William Dunn. Dunn was known as a shrewd and enterprising negotiator, worked out a deal with a Muncie Indian Chief Newahleeka to trade a silver mounted rifle, a hatchet and a keg of whiskey for 325 acres of land on the island. The Chief did later try to back out of the deal, but Dunn would have none of it and remained there as a squatter during those early pre-Revolutionary War days. William was very patriotic and jumped at the chance to fight the British in the Revolutionary War. It is even recorded over his grave that Dunn served in "Pulaski's Legion" of the Continental Troops during the war. After his discharge, William returned to Great Island and began working with the "Province of Pennsylvania" for legal title to the land now that the British were no longer in charge. He was able to secure 300 acres for a 30 pound (dollars were still not in existence) fee in silver or gold per acre. By 1785, he had received title to an additional 312 acres because of his service during the war. The village of Dunnstown, Pennsylvania was created by Dunn and his wife Sallie McKestry Dunn. William and Sallie had seven children, Ester, James, William Jr, Rebecca, Mary, Merab and John. Sallie passed away in 1782 after which William married Margaret McClelland Harrision, who had also lost her mate. Margaret proved an excellent wife to William, working with him on the continuing formation of Dunnstown and working out deals on numerous lots that were sold to settlers in the area. William had two additional children with Margaret, Washington and James. The Dunns even were known for constructing one of the first manufacturering facilities for whiskey in the area, having been assessed for a "Still House" on the 1790 tax rolls. The still remained until it was turned into a tavern by a great-granddaughter of the Dunns. James Dunn married Elizabeth Alexander and they continued the tradition of having many children: William 3rd, Elmer, Eliza, James Jr, Washington, David, Samuel, Alex, John, Polly and Jane. Also following the family's patriotic bent, James and all eight of his sons enlisted in the military and fought the British again in the War of 1812. A patriotic cousin, John Wilson Dunn, was known as the "little drummer boy" (made famous in American folklore) of the war of 1812. The history of John Wilson Dunn, is of particular interest in that he is the grandfather of Dolphy Dunn, Dorothy's father. He was known to have gone by his middle name, Wilson, rather than his given name of John, which was the name he gave his first born son. The history of the family was to change as Wilson chose to marry outside his Irish heritage choosing French woman Nanci Anne Reynoud. Reynoud had been taken to America when she was a baby by her parents, who were members of the French aristocracy and fled to avoid the guillotine. Her records had been falsified when they came to America because her parents had been terrified of being located and returned to France for execution. Nanci's name was officially changed to Nancy Reynolds, but she refused, to her dying day to renounce her heritage, or to master the nuances of the English language. The family sold much of their holdings in Pennsylvania and scattered to Chappaqua, New York, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois. John Wilson Dunn and Nancy missed Pennsylvania and moved back in 1846. While living there, Flora Ann Dunn, John M Dunn (Dorothy's grandfather), William E Dunn and Viola Dunn were born. The Dunn women, lead by Nancy, began to complain of the bluish oily film that began to spread over the streams and bubble up from the ground in their new Pennsylvania holdings. They noted that the water tasted terrible, it ruined clothing, and made life difficult in many ways. By the mid-1850s, (John) Wilson Dunn had enough and through a blanket into a stream, took it out and wrung it out into a container. Chemists then tested it and found it to burn. Dunn sold his interest in the land surrounding what later became known as Oil Creek and moved the entire family to Big Foot Prairie in Illinois where the water was pure and the oily substance was not evident. They remained in Illinois for only four years, deciding to once more move west, then settling in Wisconsin. They lived there until 1874 when (John) Wilson, who had developed a large herd of hogs and other animals, fell when feeding them and was trampled to death. Children continued to manage the farm but at the advent of the Civil War, the patriotic bug bit the family again with young members of the family fleeing to join the Union Army. John's (Dorothy's grandfather) brother George was so intent on serving he falsified his age and joined anyway. He was inducted on March 10, 1862 but only served six weeks as he received a leg would after only ten days. After recovery, George migrated to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and enlisted in the Minnesota Rangers. After once again being released he rejoined the Union forces and served until October 9, 1865, after having served with General Sherman in the infamous March to the Sea. Thereafter, George returned to the family homestead, after which the clan moved to Minnesota in 1873. Dolphy John Dunn was the second of the family (Roy having been the first) to be born in what was to become Dunn Township near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. He was born on April 1, 1889, just a year before the population of the area would grow to 25 people, the number sufficient to form a township. Dolphy's father John, was a quiet, gentle man with a personality very similar to Dorothy. He was extremely considerate of others, and looked for considerable advice on whom to marry. He was counseled by his friends and relatives to marry a young girl who would honor him above all others. He found what he considered a perfect match, a young Indian maiden named Rosetta Lightfoot. She had been born in Indiana and was only 13 years of age when they were wed. As things turned out, Rosetta was a strong matriarch for the family, very hardworking, very bright, with efforts contributing to him becoming a very weathly man throughout his lifetime. Rosetta and Johns first child was Clara Dunn, born in 1878. Dolphy and his twin sister, Elizabeth Dorpheus (known as Dorphy), were the subjects of a lot of local folklore for decades after a unique incident which occurred on their family farm when they were children. Dorphy was known as a headstrong young lady, completely unlike her father. She assumed the task of going out into the farms farthest acres to bring home the cattle for milking each evening. She would sing or whistle so wolves, bears and other wild animals would leave the area and leave her to her task in peace. One evening while chasing the cows home she was met with a huge hairy figure bolting up from the weeds on one side growling at her. Dorphy promptly pulled a revolver from her apron and shot the beast. Fortunately, she was a bit high, only creasing the very top of its head making a deep furrow in the scalp from the path of the bullet. As it turns out, the "beast" was her mischievous brother Dolphy, who had been attempting to force her to be more cautious when she went out for the cows. The fact that he covered himself with the thick hide of a bear saved his life. The thick hide deflected the bullet just enough so the bullet only creased him. Dolphy and Dorphy's sister Clara married Ray Ballard. Dorphy married Ray's brother Wesley Ballard. Westley and Dorphy named a son Ray after Wesley's brother. Ray and his wife Ginger lived out their lives in the Pelican Rapids area and had a number of children, of which Ginger Rae, Billy, and Jackie still reside in the area. Roy E Dunn, Dolphy's cousin, was the son of John's brother William E Dunn. Roy had a brother, Frank and two sisters Bessie and Laura. Roy was born in May of 1886. Roy is well known in many Minnesota historical circles in that he not only founded Dunvilla Resort but also served in the Minnesota legislature from 1924 through 1966. Roy and his wife, Anna Laura, had only one child, a daughter who married a doctor and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee. Roy and his father had the vision to buy out a disgruntled homesteader who owned 160 acres and a lot of shoreline on Lake Lizzie in the early 1900s. The startling price of the land and the lakeshore property was the princely sum of $40. They began building cabins on the lakeshore in 1908 and before long had constructed two dozen cabins on the shore. After Roy was elected to the legislature, a main lodge, styled after a California mission, was built. Vacationers from across the entire Midwest flooded to the Lodge for years before Dunn retired, sold out, and moved to live out his final years in St. Paul. Editor's Note: This has been compiled by Marlyn Hanson (penname Marlon Hanson), nephew of Dorothy Dunn. She has been a better mother than any person could be over the many years of his life. She is truly a wonderful person to all who have ever known her, having devoted her life to her family rather than seeking anything for herself. She has remained intensely religious for the entire time I have known her and undoubtedly will brighten heaven when she is finally called home. Special thanks to Perlia Jean King, who wrote a book "A Familty through the Centuries 800-1996" covering the history of the Dunns and the O'Dunns before them. The inf
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